Nature in a fine balance and the hunt for the equilibrium

Would you believe this is a man-made lake?!

Would you believe this is a man-made lake?!

Whether a larger pond or lake has been man-made or naturally occurring they should be a well balanced ecosystem, although on many occasions this isn’t the case as there is a very fine line between the two. Each body of water is unique with an array of different factors affects it delicate state; some are easier to control than others.

The same principles apply to all size ponds/ lake/ bodies of water; it is desired to achieve a balanced ecosystem; where all the fundamentals of that ecosystem are flourishing. Within this we have to try and work with nature to ensure we achieve this balance. Whether it be controlling debris entering the system, the suspended solid levels in the water column or amount of algae present.


Is your large pond or lake cloudy or have algae issues?

Do you think this ecosystem is flourish as it should be?

Do you think this ecosystem is flourish as it should be?

Unfortunately the traditional ideas of creating a pond are much out-of-date and are doomed to fail, on far too many occasions we have seen large man-made lakes where soil has been put back on top of the liner! Yes, it may seem natural but all soil types are full of lovely nutrients and other elements that cause havoc for an aquatic ecosystem, and in turn feed algae blooms and suspended solids issues. Yes, soil is naturally occurring but we can have much better control over what is going into the ecosystem simply by using an inert medium!

Please check out link to ecosystem pond page, for future details on creating a balanced ecosystem – this is very much the case for a larger pond or lake but obviously on a more grand scale.

Sediment loads increase over the course of time which subsequently lead to the unavoidable, invasive and expensive process of dredging! Not to mention that the build up of this sediment in certain areas can contain heavy metals, chemical build ups and other nasty pollutants further increasing the costs for correct disposal.


Not all hope is lost; aeration is underrated in large systems and can be crucial for a well balanced ecosystem

Air being injected into this beautiful lake

Air being injected into this beautiful lake

Aerators come in many forms they can be air stones that create micro- bubbles at the surface or large fountains that spit water metres into the air. They all are beneficial to larger systems.

Aerating a large waterscape is crucial to maintaining its natural beauty; it is possibly the most undervalued aspect for a successful flourishing larger pond or lake. The beneficial bacteria that balance an aquatic ecosystem need good oxygenation and circulation for high-quality growth, which in turn breaks down the organic waste at the bottom of the lake at a more successful rate. The abundance of beneficial bacteria inhibits the growth rates of algae, leads to cleaner and clearer water, and of course increases the overall health of the ecosystem for all aquatic life.

By adding bottom aeration to your waterscape we will be proactively reducing the organic sediment levels at the bottom of the pond thus reducing the nutrient levels that cause algal blooms. Bottom aeration combined with a constructed wetland will ensure you have complete filtration to keep your system thriving for many, many years.