Large wildlife lake bank erosion repair, treatment for green water problems & creation of planted island


A resident moorhen checking out DU Waterscapes work

A resident moorhen checking out DU Waterscapes work

Broadcast application of algae treatment

Broadcast application of algae treatment

Planting up the newly created island

Planting up the newly created island

In Kingston St Mary, DU Waterscapes found a large wildlife lake that had several issues including algae and heavy bank erosion.

The erosion was due to the wind, something that was not taken into consideration when first building this lake (lucky we came along when we did!). Ducks also played a part in this erosion, trampling on the already eroding banks (as cute as they are, ducks have huge impacts on wildlife ponds and can decimate aquatic life).

We were lucky enough to have a collection of slate on the property, this was utilised and recycled to create a dry stone wall effect around the pond, this would minimise the wave action erosion and also help ease the sediment build up in the lake itself.

Semi aquatic plants were added into the edging to give the lake a more naturalistic feel and to give the soil something to grip on to.

The lake was coming together nicely, and a treatment was added to the water to combat the excess algae, we were asked to visit again that summer to install a water feature and add to the already existing rockery island, softening the featureless boulders.

Now, ducks like eating plants – it’s a well known fact! So to combat the issue of the ducks destroying our new island oasis we hand-picked duck friendly plants from local sources, and the water feature fountain was installed along side it, bringing this lake to life.

Before we knew it the ducks were over by the island checking out their new roost.

Newly created island and foaming spout fountain

Newly created island and foaming spout fountain